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Wine for Breast Cancer Patients Springfield MO

Skin reactions are a common side effect of cancer radiation therapy, and, while medications can help prevent these problems, they can be expensive and often have their own side effects. In some cases, drugs used to reduce radiation-linked side effects can actually protect breast cancer tumor cells, according to a news release from the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

William F Cunningham
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave
Springfield, MO
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

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William Fredrick Cunningham, MD
(417) 882-4880
Cox Plz II 3850 S Natl Ave Ste 200
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Hematology-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ut Sch Of Med, Salt Lake Cty Ut 84132
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: St Johns Reg Health Center, Springfield, Mo; Lester E Cox Med Ctr -South, Springfield, Mo
Group Practice: Oncology & Hematology Assoc

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Ibrahim Abdalla, MD
(417) 269-6115
Pl II Ste 100 3850 S National
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Aleppo, Fac Of Med, Aleppo, Syria
Graduation Year: 1988

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Albert James Bonebrake, MD
(417) 875-3276
1001 E Primrose St
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Gynecological Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63104
Graduation Year: 1975

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Amy Christine Rabe, MD
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave Ste 600
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1995

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Ruth Grant, MD
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave Ste 200
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: Lester E Cox Med Ctr North, Springfield, Mo; St Johns Reg Health Center, Springfield, Mo
Group Practice: Oncology & Hematology Assoc

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Robert L Carolla
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave
Springfield, MO
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Ruth Grant
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave
Springfield, MO
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Robert Louis Carolla, MD
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave Ste 600
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1968
Hospital
Hospital: Lester E Cox Med Ctr -South, Springfield, Mo
Group Practice: Oncology & Hematology Assoc

Data Provided by:
Michael Andrew Albritton, MD
(417) 882-9960
3850 S National Ave Ste 100P2
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1977

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Wine for Breast Cancer Patients

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A glass of wine a day cut the risk of treatment-linked skin toxicity by two-thirds in women undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer, Italian researchers report.

Skin reactions are a common side effect of cancer radiation therapy, and, while medications can help prevent these problems, they can be expensive and often have their own side effects. In some cases, drugs used to reduce radiation-linked side effects can actually protect breast cancer tumor cells, according to a news release from the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

So, researchers at Catholic University and the National Research Council in Italy wondered if the natural antioxidants found in wine might work to ward off radiation-linked damage.

In the study, 348 women with breast cancer were divided into three groups depending on the dose of radiation received. The researchers found that patients who drank wine on the days they had their treatment had lower rates of Grade 2, or higher acute toxicity, than those who did not. In fact, women who drank one glass of wine a day had a 13.6 percent rate of skin toxicity compared to a 38.4 percent incidence among patients who did not consume wine, according to the study.

"If wine can prevent radiotherapy-induced toxicity without affecting antitumor efficacy, as we observed, it also has the potential to enhance the therapeutic benefit in cancer patients without increasing their risk of serious adverse effects," study author Dr. Vincenzo Valentini, a radiation oncologist at Catholic University in Rome, said in the news release. "The possibility that particular dietary practices or interventions can reduce radiation-induced toxicity is very intriguing."

The findings were published in the August issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics.

More information

Find out more about breast cancer at the American Cancer Society.

SOURCE: American Society for Radiation Oncology, news release, Aug. 13, 2009

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