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Wine for Breast Cancer Patients Lebanon MO

Skin reactions are a common side effect of cancer radiation therapy, and, while medications can help prevent these problems, they can be expensive and often have their own side effects. In some cases, drugs used to reduce radiation-linked side effects can actually protect breast cancer tumor cells, according to a news release from the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Lannis Hall-Daniels
(636) 916-9923
150 Entrance Way
Saint Peters, MO
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
Erin Hong-Dao Lang, MD
(949) 833-8178
60 Doctors Park Ste 102
Cape Girardeau, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Natl Taiwan Univ Coll Of Med, Taipei, Taiwan (385-02 Prior 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1981

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Elliot F Gellman
(314) 454-6018
1 Childrens Pl
Saint Louis, MO
Specialty
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

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Dr.David Jaques
(314) 747-2938
1 Barnes Jewish Hospital Plaza
Saint Louis, MO
Gender
M
Speciality
Oncologist
General Information
Hospital: Barnes Jewish Hospital
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Ruth Grant, MD
(417) 882-4880
3850 S National Ave Ste 200
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: Lester E Cox Med Ctr North, Springfield, Mo; St Johns Reg Health Center, Springfield, Mo
Group Practice: Oncology & Hematology Assoc

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Matthew J Ellis
(314) 362-8866
4921 Parkview Pl
Saint Louis, MO
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology, Medical Oncology

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Mark Everett Woodson, MD
(314) 355-5597
11125 Dunn Rd Ste 308
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Hematology-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: St Anthonys Health Center, Alton, Il; Christian Hosp Northeast, Saint Louis, Mo
Group Practice: Hematology Oncology Conslnts

Data Provided by:
Burton M Needle, MD
(314) 995-4400
607 S New Ballas Rd Ste 3300
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Abid Nisa, MD
(618) 451-9953
1011 Kimswick Manor Ct
Ballwin, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Robert Savary Malyapa, MD
(314) 362-8501
4921 Parkview Pl Campus Box 8224
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jawaharlal Inst Of Post-Grad Med Educ, Madras Univ, Pondicherry
Graduation Year: 1979

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Wine for Breast Cancer Patients

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A glass of wine a day cut the risk of treatment-linked skin toxicity by two-thirds in women undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer, Italian researchers report.

Skin reactions are a common side effect of cancer radiation therapy, and, while medications can help prevent these problems, they can be expensive and often have their own side effects. In some cases, drugs used to reduce radiation-linked side effects can actually protect breast cancer tumor cells, according to a news release from the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

So, researchers at Catholic University and the National Research Council in Italy wondered if the natural antioxidants found in wine might work to ward off radiation-linked damage.

In the study, 348 women with breast cancer were divided into three groups depending on the dose of radiation received. The researchers found that patients who drank wine on the days they had their treatment had lower rates of Grade 2, or higher acute toxicity, than those who did not. In fact, women who drank one glass of wine a day had a 13.6 percent rate of skin toxicity compared to a 38.4 percent incidence among patients who did not consume wine, according to the study.

"If wine can prevent radiotherapy-induced toxicity without affecting antitumor efficacy, as we observed, it also has the potential to enhance the therapeutic benefit in cancer patients without increasing their risk of serious adverse effects," study author Dr. Vincenzo Valentini, a radiation oncologist at Catholic University in Rome, said in the news release. "The possibility that particular dietary practices or interventions can reduce radiation-induced toxicity is very intriguing."

The findings were published in the August issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics.

More information

Find out more about breast cancer at the American Cancer Society.

SOURCE: American Society for Radiation Oncology, news release, Aug. 13, 2009

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